by

Three weeks ago, I wrote about Waukesha’s need for water from the Great Lakes, due significantly because some of that community’s wells had become contaminated with radium.  See, Waukesha’s Water.  A prosperous area thereby finds itself a supplicant for water supplies from the Great Lakes, because part of her own supply has become undrinkable. As it turns

by

The Wisconsin Center for Investigate Journalism has an ongoing series about the condition of Wisconsin’s water supply, with three main topics, one of which is entitled, Failure at the Faucet. I’ve mentioned the full series before. See, Water Watch Wisconsin. Reading that series – the work of many journalists over many months, is astounding.  One would think

by

This series began over a year ago, after some officials first proposed a digester energy project over two and a half years ago.  It’s worth a quick summary of where that project now stands, and the context of writing about the project. I’d say that there have been, so far, three phases to this proposal.

by

Waukesha is a large suburban city, of about seventy-thousand, in a prosperous suburban county, of about four-hundred thousand.  By ordinary estimation, the residents of the city and county should have no difficulties with basic utilities and infrastructure. And yet, Waukesha has a water supply problem: Waukesha does not have an adequate supply of water that

by

Phosphorus may be used as a fertilizer, but that use comes at a price.  A community, especially a farming community, that uses phosphorus for fertilizer faces the problem of what to do with that element when large quantities spread through the environment.   Lee Bergquist of the Journal Sentinel, in a story from 4.16.16, explains the concern

by

Two weeks ago, I posted a simple question about Whitewater’s former Hawthorn Mellody milk plant: “If there had been no milk processing plant in Whitewater, would the city have constructed digester capacity as large as it now has, for importing waste into the city from other locations?” That’s seemingly a question about a waste-importation proposal,

by

The discussion about the environment in Wisconsin varies by community, or so it seems.  Some parts of the state, particularly northeast Wisconsin, have a more active discussion because residents there perceive greater environmental risks, particularly to their water supplies. The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism has a series that follows much of this discussion, online

by

For today, a simple question about waste importation into Whitewater: 301. If there had been no milk processing plant in Whitewater, would the city have constructed digester capacity as large as it now has, for importing waste into the city from other locations? That is, in cases like these, would one ordinarily separate a production

by

Post 66 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. I posted yesterday about remarks from December on the supposed volume for payback of a waste-receiving station with today’s

by

Post 65 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. Today’s question begin is Number 298. All the questions in this series may be found in the Question Bin.