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Post 55 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. I’ve posted before about methane, but only as a foretaste of more on the subject (Methane on 11.23.15 and

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Post 54 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. There are two points to this post about Whitewater’s waste-importation proposal. First, one can state a simple fact about

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Post 53 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. When Green Turns Brown has been, and for while more will be, a mostly written account. That’s understandable: I’m

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Post 52 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. I’m not sure who first said ‘all facts are friendly,’ but for policy it’s true: one applies theories to

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Post 51 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. I’ve had lots of questions about the 12.15.15 Common Council meeting in Whitewater, that discussed waste importation, and a

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Post 50 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. This is the fiftieth post in this series, with many more to come, along with a standalone website to

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Post 49 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. View image | gettyimages.com Whitewater’s digester-energy project depends on bringing waste from cities that do not want it to

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Post 48 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. There’s a question that I omitted from Post 46  (Questions on the 9.17.15 Remarks on Waste Importation).  The question

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Post 47 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. Last week’s post looked at a description from 9.17.15 of the waste-importation plan. Earlier, on March 16, 2015, Whitewater’s

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Post 46 in a series. When Green Turns Brown is an examination of a small town’s digester-energy project, in which Whitewater, Wisconsin would import other cities’ waste, claiming that the result would be both profitable and green. In this post, I’ll offer questions based on the 9.17.15 remarks of Whitewater’s city manager, Cameron Clapper, about a